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    Washington State Probate Series: Probate basics-part 1

    January 31, 2019

     

    The next blog series is on Washington State probate.  Probate tends to be a topic that many of our clients want to discuss because they hear that probate is so "dreaded".  This blog series will provide basic information on Washington State probate, what to do if someone dies and you are appointed personal representative and will offer a helpful checklist.

     

    Washington Probate-What is Probate?

     

    Probate is the legal process of settling the estate of someone who has passed away. In practice, this means that a person is appointed by the court (a “personal representative”) to step into the decedent’s shoes and wind up his or her affairs.

     

    Washington Probate-I have heard that I need to avoid probate at all costs.

     

    Washington State has one of the simplest and quickest probate systems in the nation.  The probate procedure in Washington is typically less expensive than many other states, such as California, because attorney’s fees are not based upon a percentage of the value of the estate.  Of course, improper or inadequate planning may make the probate process more difficult, expensive and time consuming. If you would like some information about proper estate planning, contact us or check out our estate planning blog series

     

    Washington Probate-How long does it last?

     

    Probate in Washington lasts a minimum of four months because of the time someone has to make a “Will contest claim” and in addition creditors have four month to present a creditor claim against the estate (if they receive notice of death).

     

    If you would like more information on Washington State probate, please feel free to reach out to the attorneys at Leos & Gilkerson or stay tuned for more blog posts. 

     

    Disclaimer: The information in this blog post (“post”) is provided for general informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal advice from Leos & Gilkerson, PLLC or the individual author, nor is it intended to be a substitute for legal counsel on any subject matter. No reader of this post should act or refrain from acting on the basis of any information included in, or accessible through, this Post without seeking the appropriate legal or other professional advice on the particular facts and circumstances at issue from a licensed lawyer.

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